Changing up my Twitter following/usage

TL;DR: I’m unfollowing lots of people on Twitter and I swear, it’s not you, it’s me.

I go through periods where I need to change my social media style for one reason or another, and I’m in the middle of another one. I’ve been spending less and less time on Twitter because I’d been just simply overloaded by following around 1,000 people; I tried employing lists and keeping the same main following, but it’s just not working. So, I’ve started moving lots and lots of people over to lists that I’m now checking in a different way, and working on whittling down my main feed to things and people I don’t see or interact with elsewhere, or who post radically different content on Twitter than their other platforms/newsletters/blogs/etc. Especially if we’re friends on Facebook, I’m unfollowing you because I love and participate with folks in a personal way much better there. The lists I’m adding a bunch of yous to, I’m still getting the hang of checking and using well (hello, Twitter, do something about that). If I miss important news or you want to get ahold of me, I check @’s a ton, and many of you have my contact info anyways. 

love love love yous. thank you for understanding!

susanmernit:

“….almost every major shift in my choice of careers has been facilitated by people that I met in different (and sometimes bizarre) circumstances. Those shifts were almost never linear in a traditional sense: I graduated with an honors degree in linguistics, and have worked in telecommunications, finance, advertising, media and advocacy. Each of the experiences I’ve had informed the next, but were often so radically different from one another that my resume could look to some like a hodge-podge of indecision. (via When Careers Aren’t Paths: Using Networks to Grow Your Future - Forbes)

susanmernit:

“….almost every major shift in my choice of careers has been facilitated by people that I met in different (and sometimes bizarre) circumstances. Those shifts were almost never linear in a traditional sense: I graduated with an honors degree in linguistics, and have worked in telecommunications, finance, advertising, media and advocacy. Each of the experiences I’ve had informed the next, but were often so radically different from one another that my resume could look to some like a hodge-podge of indecision. (via When Careers Aren’t Paths: Using Networks to Grow Your Future - Forbes)

Reblogged from susanmernit

Coming out as a secret introvert

Part 1: Free to be you and me (well, sort of)

Recently, I saw this wonderful graphic about introverts being passed around.

While there are some points that apply to everyone — “don’t reprimand them in public” is just a generally sound piece of advice — the rest do hit home for a lot of introverts, including me. If you know me, you’re probably thinking, “I’m sorry, what? You’re one of the most outgoing people I know!” In person, when someone said this to me, I laughed and told them, “Just because I’m an attention whore doesn’t mean I’m an extrovert.”

Read More

Overhauling my Facebook profile

Like many of my friends with lives as semi-public figures (writers, activists, actors, etc.), I’ve decided that I need a more delineated approach to how my life on Facebook is managed. As many of you know, I’ve advocated (especially in my book) for a more-the-merrier approach to what you share with whom, since I feel like the cross-pollination of our lives across multiple spheres (work, family, friends) can really go a long way towards digital consciousness raising.

I still believe that deeply, but I’m having some difficulty managing my Facebook relationships with people that I don’t know at all. One of the main challenges I’ve run up against is how Facebook is now much more of a web platform/identity manager than it was previously. It connects with a multitude other services and tools now that don’t let me distinguish how I know people. I manage my information on Facebook itself with lists and assigning privileges to them, but it’s just not working for other services. I’m not able to take advantage of some new tools, because I can’t manage the flow of info, and I feel like I’m missing out on those new services. (And I’m not able to do the R&D I need to on behalf of my clients).

For about six months now, I’ve debated setting up a public page for myself. I’ve felt weird about it because it’s always felt like, “Really? A public page, Deanna? You’re not famous! Who do you think you are?” In the end, though, I haven’t found another way for me to stay in touch with people who are interested in my work/life but with whom I don’t have a personal relationship.

Thus, I’ve set up a page for myself and want to ask folks that feel so inclined to like that page. Over the coming weeks, I’ll be deleting friends that I don’t know or don’t know that well from my personal Facebook profile.

I don’t plan on changing what I post publicly on either my profile or my page (which will have Twitter hooked up to it). I’m still pretty free-for-all when it comes to what I share, and I know where my boundaries are about what’s private for me. I believe that every person should share according to where their comfort zone is, though, and every person should be able to decide what kinds of relationships they want to engage with.

I apologize if this hurts folks’ feelings, or if it makes them feel weird about my evangelizing on how I think sharing on social networks can change the world. I’ve advocated for more nuanced features in these services, but we’re just not there yet. Hopefully this will be an understandable stopgap measure until we get there.

Being a responsible community member during highly-charged events

There’s a longer post that I’ll write up about social media at the AZ shootings, but for the moment I wanted to share some excerpts from my book as a gentle reminder to check everything you share before you post. There were some awful mishaps this weekend, and I hate to see us keep repeating the same mistakes over and over.

You can read all the sections from this part of my book:

Here are some key excerpts from each…

Stop, Drop and Think

While sharing news is generally a good thing (hey, you’re reading Share This!), we’re not necessarily equipped to process and react responsibly when we’re hit with surprising or salacious news — or information that provokes a strong emotional response. We tend to share first and ask questions later, and, as we’ll see below, doing so can cause serious damage and distrust.

Part of this shortcoming is biological: the part of our brains that reacts to emotional content, the amygdala, isn’t the most sophisticated piece of machinery. It interprets and paints events and emotions in broad strokes, most simply as positive or negative. Not a lot of nuance there.

The rest of our brain is supposed to help by engaging and filtering information based on context. We’re supposed to take into account physical actions, such as a person’s body language and the tone of conversation, as well as our surroundings. Digital media doesn’t provide these cues, so the other parts of our brain aren’t activated. In fact, research shows that email flaming (inappropriate negative reactions expressed publicly online) is a result of these missing cues[1].

[1] The absence of tone and body language seems to shunt slightly annoying words straight into our reptile brains and get us all upset right away. Fascinating read, check it out: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/20/health/psychology/20essa.html

I’m Not Dead Yet: Stopping Info Misflow

Before the Internet, we relied on the authority of our peers to share trustworthy information, with some degree of success (and failure… I grew up thinking I’d die if I simultaneously ate Pop Rocks and drank a Coke). The Internet hits the scene, and suddenly there’s an explosion of urban legends. Remember those email chains where a little boy with cancer only wished to see his email forwarded around?

Urban legends and hoaxes make emotional appeals that force us to address our common cultural fears (death, terror, freaky candy that pops in your mouth). If we trust the information source (usually a friend or family member), we usually believe the information is true… we transfer a person’s general trustworthiness to individual bits of news, without verifying whether the information is correct.

But if someone repeatedly shares enough false information, we naturally respond by lowering the authority that person has in the news-sharing department. Quick survey: How many people don’t read emails from Aunt Beatrice anymore because she sent the human organ theft hoax again?

We’re at roughly the same level with social networks right now as we were with email in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The tools are new and snazzy, and we don’t yet have a sophisticated understanding of the role they play in our lives.

When Twittering Goes Awry

Everyday people on social networks were susceptible to the same bandwagon mentality. The high emotional content of the information coming out of Iran drove people to share first and source later. The resulting confusion of reports being shared outside of Iran didn’t necessarily lead directly to the arrest or deaths of protesters, but the proliferation of misinformation did create a mythology about the impact social networking tools actually had on serious, life-changing events inside a repressive regime. To a large extent, Iranian protesters were not using Twitter, and the cell phone network had been shut down. By perpetuating the myth that protesters were subverting a dangerous, repressive, totalitarian regime purely with shiny new technology, mainstream media and participants who shared misinformation created a dangerous situation for the next conflict, in which dissenters could mistakenly believe that these tools will save their lives on their own. Technology of any kind, especially in countries run by despots, will not absolve us from responsibility for the difficult, and dangerous, work of organizing against power structures that threaten lives.

Lessons of Iran’s Aftermath

We have to demand more accountability from our sources, regardless of who they might be. We may not have the benefit of the physical cues (voice and body language), but we have learned over time to be more savvy news consumers. And we’ve come to demand accountability — whether we get our news from large, well-funded companies or from small blogs. We need to apply skepticism and critical thinking skills to our networks as well. Finally, we have to learn a new kind of media literacy, one where we are not simply reacting. I’m reminded of the advice we were given as kids: If you’re on fire, “stop drop and roll.” Try this: if your news stream is on fire, stop, drop and think. Take a moment to process the information you receive and verify it through authoritative sources.

It’s important that we choose wisely. As we’ve discussed before, all of us have a critical role to play in the changing nature of authority and in determining who becomes valued as a trusted news source. As we create new guidelines for coming generations, we have a responsibility to support spaces where diverse voices are heard, varied experiences are shared, and trustworthy information is spread.